Category: Portland

Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land by Leah Penniman

Farming While Black is the first comprehensive “how to” guide for aspiring African-heritage growers to reclaim their dignity as agriculturists and for all farmers to understand the distinct, technical contributions of African-heritage people to sustainable agriculture. Black ancestors and contemporaries have always been leadersand continue to leadin the sustainable agriculture and food justice movements.

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Dear Stranger: Connecting Oregonians, one letter at a time

How can we understand the experiences of people living in such different places throughout Oregon? How can we work together for the good of all? Dear Stranger, a letter-exchange project that connects Oregonians from different parts of the state through the mail, strives to create understanding across the vastness of this place. Letters will be received through October 26.

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School’s Out, So Let Us In—to Play

Are school fields and playgrounds in your community locked up after class? Salud America offers a free toolkit to help you advocate for an “open use” policy in your district that allows local residents to use school recreational facilities when class isn’t in session. Download the kit for help to start the conversation.

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Native Americans, through Different Lenses

Now through May, The Portland Art Museum is showcasing the work of Edward Curtis, a famous non-Native photographer of Native Americans in the early 1900s. The exhibition also features contemporary portraits by NativeAmericans, challenging audiences to think critically about how artists portray the Native experience.

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Put Oregon on the Nation’s Junk Food Map

PreventObesity.net, a project of the American Heart Association, wants Oregonians to help  show the impact of junk food marketing on U.S. kids and teens. Email your story or upload a photo: It could be the fast-food billboard near your neighborhood school, or that soda promotion that came home in your child’s backpack.

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